I think of myself as Juliana’s coach

There’s a bit of a fad now about parents who have been successful at forcing their children to lose weight with “strict and punishing” methods.  While the daughter in the article, now 8, is a healthy weight, you have to wonder if the mother’s methods are going to come back to haunt her later.

To me, it makes more sense to think of yourself as a coach.  No child or teen wants to be overweight.  If you provide them a path to a healthy weight that doesn’t require semi-starvation, they will embrace it.  The key is low carb eating–but there are many other things you may need to tweak.  Juliana’s weight loss was abruptly halted by allergy medications.  It took me 6 weeks to figure out that they were a problem.  Another time we decided she needed to drink much more water, and that got her weight loss going again.  In the Calories In/Calories Out model, these sort of hidden obstacles to weight loss do not get much attention.

Before she started eating low carb, I used to worry about everything she ate, and hope she would eat smaller portions.  Now, we think of weight loss as a big puzzle.  We need to continuously work on the the puzzle to get her to a healthy weight.  I keep reading, and make suggestions of new things to try.

The mother in the above article, Dara-Lynn Weiss, reportedly once tried the Atkins eating plan.  I’m willing to bet she didn’t do it correctly, or she would have finally understood what she had gone through with all the different diets she had tried, and what was going on with her daughter’s huge appetite.

Your child isn’t going to become an expert on low carb eating without your help.  As the coach, you need to learn everything you can to help your child work out his or her own weight loss puzzle.